Student Employment Guidelines

Academic Year Guidelines

FERPA | Authorization Requirements | Hiring | Full-Time Job Policy | Teaching Assistants| Returning Students | Special Scholarships | International Students | Hiring Priority | Earnings Limits | Job Descriptions | Requesting New Student Positions | Advertising | Compensation | Payroll Paperwork | Pay Grades and Rates | Timecard Management | Work Schedule | Warnings, Terminations and Appeals Procedures | Absenteeism | Contact

FERPA:
There are important limitations on accessing and sharing student information placed on us by federal legislation and college policy. The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, often referred to as FERPA or the Buckley Amendment, provides considerable protection to our students and their records and legal sanctions against the College if we do not comply. Therefore, it is necessary to understand your responsibilities before being provided access to student information.

Under FERPA, information is divided into two categories: directory and non-directory. The law covers the educational records of living persons who are attending, or who have attended, the College so the following procedures and policies cover both students and living alumni/ae.

Unless the student or alumnus/a specifies otherwise to the Registrar, the College may, but is not required to, release what it defines as directory information without the prior consent of the individual. Except under specific circumstances stipulated in the legislation, e.g. in response to a lawful subpoena or an emergency, the College may not release non-directory information without the prior consent of the student or alumnus/a.

Williams defines the following as directory information: name; permanent and College addresses; campus electronic mail address; permanent and campus telephone numbers; date and place of birth; country of citizenship; major field, extra-curricular activities; height and weight of members of athletic teams; dates of attendance; degrees, honors and awards; other schools attended. Although this information is defined as directory or “public” under the law, we do not release it indiscriminately. We do not, for instance, provide directories to outside agencies who wish to prepare mailing lists or otherwise solicit our students. We would ask that you also follow this procedure. Please direct inquiries for information from off-campus to the Office of the Registrar.

In general, faculty and staff have access to personally identifiable non-directory information about students as long as they have a legitimate educational interest in the data, or a “need to know.”  Legitimate interests might include hiring a student during the academic year; seeking information to assist in writing a letter of recommendation; or gathering information to update department or program records.

Releasing personally identifiable non-directory information to others without prior permission from the student or alumnus/a is illegal. You cannot, for instance, provide information about students, even to parents, unless the student or alumnus/a has given you prior written permission to share the data. This includes the student’s enrollment information, all financial aid information, and work history.

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Authorization Requirements: No department, program, office, or student organization may employ a Williams student without the approval from the Provost’s Office.  A manager’s budget must be approved for student employment by his/her superior and the Provost’s Office.

Any employee or student leader who will oversee Williams student workers must complete training and paperwork with the Employment Manager.  Student employment is regulated by the same organizations as regular staff (i.e., U.S. Department of Labor, Internal Revenue Service, U.S. Department of Justice, as well as state regulators), in addition to the U.S. Department of Education if the employee is receiving need-based campus employment aid.  It is imperative that supervisors understand their roles and legal obligations.  The training provides instruction on (i) governmental and institutional student employment policy and procedure and (ii) the PeopleSoft Manager Self Service module.  Supervisors must sign an agreement upon completion of their training that will give them access to the PeopleSoft module.

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Hiring | First-Year and Transfer Student Job Policy: Hiring priority is determined by Financial Aid. Supervisors are responsible for communicating with and screening applicants and then hiring them in PeopleSoft through the Manager Self Service menu. Supervisors are not permitted to hire low priority first-year students, or transfer students until the end of the drop/add period in the middle of September. After that time all students who complete the proper eligibility paperwork may be hired.

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Returning Students: Returning students are defined as all rising or current sophomores, juniors, and seniors.  These students are expected to secure their own jobs; but they may seek the assistance of the Student Employment Manager, if necessary.

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Special Scholarships: Recipients of special scholarships, such as the Tyng Scholarship, Mellon-Mays Fellowship or Williams Undergraduate Research Fellowship, may only work on campus with the approval of the Paul Boyer, Director of Financial Aid and/or the Molly Magavern, Coordinator of Special Academic Programs.

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International Students: International students (non-resident aliens) may not work off campus unless they have applied for and received work authorization form the United States government. (An F-1 visa does not give work authorization). Off campus work study positions are available only to U.S. citizens on financial aid with a federal work study component.

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Teaching Assistants:  A Teaching Assistant (TA) is a student who assists a professor with instructional responsibilities.  TAs can be hired on a 1/2 time, 3/4 time or full-time basis. At Williams, both undergraduates and graduate students are eligible to be TAs; and they receive a stipend for their work.  The Teaching Assistant program is managed by Gail Burda in the Office of Dean of Faculty.  More information regarding the TA program is available on their website.

In most cases, full-time TAs are not permitted to work a concurrent  job on campus, since the combined hours  would exceed the full-time job policy.

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Full-Time Job Policy:

  • A full-time job for first-year students is defined as 7-8 hours per week of work during the academic year.
  • A full-time job for returning students is defined as 8-10 hours per week of work during the academic year.

The College generally limits students to one full-time job to safeguard study time and encourage active involvement in extracurricular activities.  Supervisors must not employ students who have already committed to one full-time job or multiple part-time jobs that equate to one full-time job.

Exceptions to the full-time job policy have been made for those positions that 1) provide tutoring to peers or elementary and secondary students; 2) require a specialized skill; and/or 3) require occasional hours for duties that are community service or extracurricular in nature. A student may work one or more of these positions up to an additional three hours per week in the aggregate. The following is a list of approved occasional jobs and is subject to review annually by Human Resources:

Geosciences Intern and Geosciences Van Driver
Hosts and Servers
Intramural Coordinator and Intramural Referee
Lifeguard
Log Lunch Worker
Studio Art Model
Quest for College College Awareness Counselor
Sports Info Assistant
Theatre Event Assistant [Ushers only]
Admission Tour Guide
Tutor [America Reads / America Counts / Mt. Greylock Regional School District / Elementary Outreach / Academic Resources]
Williams Record Distribution Manager
Williamstown House of Local History Intern
Williamstown Milne Public Library Assistant
Williamstown Youth Center, Program Assistant
Williams Outing Club: Climbing Wall Instructor, PE Instructor, PE Supervisor, Ropes Course Facilitator, Winter Carnival Gatekeeper, Winter Carnival Race Worker

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Hiring Priority:  Most students receiving financial aid are expected to earn a portion of their educational expenses with a campus job offered to them as part of their financial aid package; therefore, any student who receives a “need-based job”  must be given high priority in hiring.

Graduate Art History students are generally employed by the Art Department in positions related to their education.  CDE students receive the least priority and may only be hired with prior approval of the Director of the CDE and Employment Manager.

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Campus Earnings Limits: The College caps the earnings of all students to protect job equity and accessibility, as well as keep academics and extracurriculars the primary focus of the student body, and to comply with federal law surrounding  financial aid award distribution.  The Provost’s Office determines limits on an annual basis; however, individual limits are subject to change for various reasons.

The Office of Financial Aid monitors earnings on a monthly basis and is responsible for addressing questions regarding individual limits.

The current academic year limits are as follows:


2014-15 Earnings Limits

$1,800  First-years
$2,100  Sophomores
$2,100  Juniors
$2,100  Seniors

Monitoring earnings is a joint responsibility shared by the student, the supervisor, and the Office of Financial Aid (regardless of the student’s financial aid status); however, the student is primarily responsible for adhering to his or her limit.

They can track their earnings through PeopleSoft under the My Employment menu.  If a student overearns or expects to overearn, then he or she should contact the Office of Financial Aid to request an increase.  If an increase cannot be made, then the student must reduce his or her hours or resign.

Campus employers are greatly impacted by student workers reaching their earning limits early; utilizing the Manger Self-Service menu in PeopleSoft, supervisors can monitor earnings of current employees and verify if other positions are held by potential employees.

Questions regarding earning limits should be directed to Betsy Hobson in Financial Aid.

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Job Descriptions: Federal regulations mandate that the college maintains up-to-date student job descriptions.  Campus employers should annually review their active student positions (a list is available for authorized users on PeopleSoft > Manager Self Service > Student Positions).  A Student Job Description Form must be submitted to James Cart or Danielle Gonzalez in Human Resources, for any position that needs to be updated, terminated, or created new.

Additionally, Student Job Description Forms are used to craft job ads posted on the Student Employment website.

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Requesting New Student Positions:  Each position is individually created based on department needs and with approval of  Human Resources.  Students are not allowed to work in an unauthorized student position for any campus department, office, or student organization.

Procedures to request a new student position:
1.    Complete the Student Job Description Form and submit to StudentEmployment@williams.edu.
2.    HR will assign a pay grade to the new position and create the position in PeopleSoft.

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Advertising:  Standard labor practice recommends the College post all available jobs in a central location.  The Student Employment website is considered the main advertising location for student positions and should be used accordingly.  Campus employers may also post jobs on department websites, Daily Messages, WSO, and the Career Center website.

When a supervisor is ready to advertise on the Student Employment website, he/she must contact StudentEmployment@williams.edu.  Job postings should be posted for a minimum of  one week.  Supervisors are responsible for notifying the Employment Manager when jobs have been filled and postings need to be removed.

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Compensation: All student jobs are paid through the college’s Payroll office.  Students may not be paid by voucher through the Accounts Payable office unless they are approved by the Employment Manager to be independent contractors.

A student job refers to any position which is employed by a Williams office, department, program, or student organization and is compensated by Williams College.  A job’s duration may last one academic year, one semester, one month, or one hour.  Whether students are hired to host parties, sell tickets, hang-up publicity, research, create websites, or monitor entrances, they must be paid through the Payroll office.

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Payroll Paperwork:  Students are required to complete the federal Form I9 before they begin working. This form must be completed in person, and may be done so at any time in The Office of Human Resources. Only certain Identification documents are acceptable; see the last page of the Form I9 for a list of acceptable documents.

There are two additional tax forms to be completed in PeopleSoft after the student has been hired into a position. The first is the Form W4, used to determine how much federal income tax should be withheld from each paycheck. The second is the M4, used to determine how much state income tax should be withheld from each paycheck. Once a student has been hired, they will be emailed with directions on where to complete these two tax forms.

Additionally, we encourage students to sign up for Direct Deposit, a free service that deposits money directly into any US bank account. This can be done after you’ve received the automated hire email from PeopleSoft.

Social Security tax (F.I.C.A.) is not withheld from student earnings on-campus or  off-campus Federal Work Study earnings during the academic year.  F.I.C.A. taxes must be withheld from any off-campus earnings (non Federal Work Study) and summer employment on campus.

Check out the Guidelines for Faculty/Staff and Students: I-9, W-4 and M-4 Forms.  If you need to file a tax return or have additional questions please visit www.IRS.gov. Taxable Income for Students external IRS link.

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Pay Grades and Rates: Student pay grades and rates are designed (i) to foster pay  equities between jobs that permit study time and those that do not and (ii) to encourage job retention.  The Employment Manager and Student Employment Coordinator monitor grades and rates for each student position.  Hiring departments, programs, offices, and student organizations are not authorized to determine pay rates and must abide by the Williams College Pay Grade and Rate Schedule.  Pay grades and rates apply to all Williams-affiliated positions, including off-campus Federal Work Study positions.

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Timecard Management:  Students and supervisors are responsible for completing, reviewing, and submitting timecards according to the Williams Student Pay Schedule, which must be publicly posted in each employer work space.  Supervisors must submit timecards to the Office of Human Resources by the published deadlines to ensure that students are paid according to the pay period in which they worked.  No wage advances or special checks may be issued; and students are not allowed to purposefully accumulate and submit timecards for multiple pay periods at one time.  Click to view sample of a properly completed timecard.

Student employees must:
1.    Record name, pay period, hours, and days worked on the back of the timecard;
2.    Record Williams ID, name, job title, department, class year, campus mailbox number, pay period, and total hours worked in the spaces provided on the front of the timecard, being sure to fill in any corresponding circles; and
3.    Sign and date the timecard.

Supervisors must:
1.    Record student job numbers and PeopleSoft account codes in the spaces provided on the front of the card, being sure to fill in the corresponding circles;
2.    Review student entries on each timecard for complete accuracy;
3.    Sign timecards (Student Managers may NOT sign timecards);
4.    Collate timecards in alphabetical order and attach a calculator tape of total hours worked for all students to the top of the pile; and
5.    Deliver timecards to the Payroll office by the published deadlines (students cannot submit their own timecards).

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Work Schedules:  Supervisors are expected to establish work schedules with student employees.  A schedule of set hours by semester is the most satisfactory arrangement for most jobs.  In some cases, it may not be possible to schedule hours for an entire semester.  Some supervisors may have special projects or peak periods when they wish to schedule students for concentrated blocks of time. Supervisors must consider student employees’ academic and extracurricular workload when determining work schedules. As an alternative, students may be scheduled on a monthly basis.

Students employees should inform their supervisor of any known conflicts in their schedules that may prevent them from working.  Per federal regulations, students are not permitted to work during times they are scheduled to attend class; therefore, supervisors are encouraged to obtain a copy of their employees’ class schedules for reference when scheduling.  For part-time jobs, supervisors should also consider the work schedules of the students’ other jobs.

The academic year includes reading and exam periods and partial weeks at the beginning and end of vacation periods. Therefore, the duration of a job is approximately 30 weeks. Supervisors are urged to schedule first-year students a minimum of 7 hours per week and a maximum of 8 hours per week (i.e., full-time job).  Returning  students may be scheduled a maximum of 10 hours per week for one job or multiple part-time jobs.  Financial aid students who cannot meet their earnings expectation within their full-time job may be able to hold a second job with approval from the Office of Financial Aid.

Reading and examination periods are considered part of the academic year, and although students are expected to work during these periods, supervisors should be flexible with student’s schedules, if necessary, so that each student will have adequate opportunity to prepare for examinations.

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Warnings, Terminations, and Appeals Procedures: The college depends on its student employees to be reliable and conscientious.  Repeated negligence such as absenteeism, tardiness, time card abuse, or lack of job performance may warrant a warning or even dismissal.

Most job-related difficulties or misunderstandings should be worked out between the individual student and the supervisor.  Generally, a conversation between student employee and the supervisor should be the first course of action.  If that conversation or subsequent conversations proves unsuccessful in modifying the problem, the supervisor must send the student employee  a written warning; and the Employment Manager should be consulted in drafting this notice.  If a written warning proves unsuccessful, the supervisor has grounds for dismissing the student.  Supervisors may consult with the Employment Manager at any time.

Students dismissed for valid and supportable reasons will not be allowed to work on campus for the remainder of the academic year.

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Absenteeism:  If illness or some other unavoidable circumstance prevents attendance at work, the student employee must notify the supervisor as soon as possible.  It is the student employee’s responsibility to find an approved substitute if the supervisor has supplied a list of names for that purpose.  Continued absenteeism is cause for disciplinary action or dismissal.

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Questions about these procedures or related matters should be directed to:

StudentEmployment@williams.edu
HR office: 413-597-2681